Food Supplies Excursions Art Spaces
alannarisse:

mfa-acd:

Check out this Drain interview with MFA AC+D Associate Chair, Heidi Schwegler. 
From the interview:

If you’re paying close attention to the center, you don’t notice the periphery until there’s a disruption. These dots of material and color compel me. When I was in environments far from the comfort of home, I became aware of the notion of perceptual blindness, a phenomenon that makes it difficult to understand what one sees in a place disconnected from all that is familiar. As you experience this rupture in visual understanding, you have to work harder to see. Ultimately your vision becomes more acute. Having to consciously observe afforded me the perceptual clarity to see a cardboard box again for the first time


Heidi Schwegler on discarded objects
alannarisse:

mfa-acd:

Check out this Drain interview with MFA AC+D Associate Chair, Heidi Schwegler. 
From the interview:

If you’re paying close attention to the center, you don’t notice the periphery until there’s a disruption. These dots of material and color compel me. When I was in environments far from the comfort of home, I became aware of the notion of perceptual blindness, a phenomenon that makes it difficult to understand what one sees in a place disconnected from all that is familiar. As you experience this rupture in visual understanding, you have to work harder to see. Ultimately your vision becomes more acute. Having to consciously observe afforded me the perceptual clarity to see a cardboard box again for the first time


Heidi Schwegler on discarded objects

alannarisse:

mfa-acd:

Check out this Drain interview with MFA AC+D Associate Chair, Heidi Schwegler. 

From the interview:

If you’re paying close attention to the center, you don’t notice the periphery until there’s a disruption. These dots of material and color compel me. When I was in environments far from the comfort of home, I became aware of the notion of perceptual blindness, a phenomenon that makes it difficult to understand what one sees in a place disconnected from all that is familiar. As you experience this rupture in visual understanding, you have to work harder to see. Ultimately your vision becomes more acute. Having to consciously observe afforded me the perceptual clarity to see a cardboard box again for the first time

Heidi Schwegler on discarded objects

Laura Heit

Laura Heit (PNCA LRVS mentor) will be premiering two new works this Sunday as a part of the second Season of Zena Zezza. Her pieces revisit the Portland flood of 1894. This multifaceted show inhabits the oldest standing commercial building in Portland. The second floor hosts two Anthony McCall Pieces that are not to be missed. See below for details.

If you can’t make the opening the building will be open several days a week until Dec 13.

image

Opening Reception 

Sunday, October 19, 2–5pm 

Hallock & McMillan, drawing from Kuchel & Dresel lithograph, 1858. Courtesy the Oregon Historical Society

Zena Zezza has the fortuitous use of a new space and invites you to the opening of the first projects at the Hallock & McMillan—Portland’s oldest commercial structure built in 1857, predating Oregon’s statehood (1859). The Hallock & McMillan stands as testimony to Portland’s history and is located across from Waterfront Park in the heart of Old Town.

Opening Reception: Sunday, October 19, 2–5pm

Anthony McCall: Artist Project Season

New York-based British artist Anthony McCall’s solid light installation, “You and I, Horizontal” fills part of the upper floor with immaterial sculptural forms which create a new spatial experience of the Hallock & McMillan. Since the early ’70s, McCall has redefined the boundaries between sculpture, film, performance and drawing, and between the viewer and the work. Coincident with his work in Portland, McCall’s work is being shown in Amsterdam, Auckland, Metz, France, and Santiago de Compostela.  

image

Zena introduces the "1857 Projects" which this season looks back to the mid-to-late 1800s. 

Laura Heit: 1857 Project

Portland artist Laura Heit re-imagines Portland’s history and the Great Flood of 1894 in a two-part installation using animation, projection and photographs from the archive and collection of the Oregon Historical Society’s Davies Family Research Library. Heit’s films and performances often deal with subjects from the mundane to the cataclysmic. 

Hallock & McMillan
237 SW Naito Parkway (at SW Oak Street)
Portland, Oregon 97204

Zena’s use of the space is through the generosity of John Russell and Russell Fellows Properties.

Special thanks to Geoff Wexler, Library Director, and the Oregon Historical Society for their partnership in realizing the “1857 Project.”

Zena Zezza is a project directed by Sandra Percival

www.zenazezza.org

Please share with your friends and colleagues. 

Become a Friend of Zena’s at http./www.zenazezza.org/detail.php?id=39,57. All donations are tax deductible. 

image

Barry Pelzner at Froelick Gallery

PNCA painting faculty Barry Pelzer is showing his current body of work at the Froelick Gallery. Alanna Risse (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘15) is light TAing Barry’s Materials and Methods painting class as part of her Critical Pedagogy course this semester. These large scale drawings employ virtuosic application of the most mundane of writing implements — the ball point pen. More details about the show:

Barry Pelzner 
A Thin Black Line 
SEPTEMBER 30 - NOVEMBER 1, 2014 
Exhibition tour and discussion with the artists
Saturday, October 11, 2014
11am

Barry Pelzner returns to Froelick Gallery with A Thin Black Line, his first solo exhibition since 2010, and the result of a period in which the style and content of his work has undergone a dramatic shift. His previous works have been based on direct observation of landscapes, whereas Pelzner’s new series of drawings- black ballpoint pen on white paper- are a move toward “working within a drastically limited pictorial vocabulary”.

Thousands of darting, expressive marks fill his compositions, varying in weight from heavy, paper-indenting knots to light strokes which barely flit over the surface. The subject of these works might be considered “motion”- suggestive titles such as Condense and Flex are playfully described in dense, saturated regions of black that dissipate in to frayed, wooly lines. Pelzner says of these drawings “They are part of an attempt to discover how much of the visible world I can represent, or suggest, without drawing any of the objects in it.”

Visit the Froelick Gallery website for more details.

bregipson:

Mural @ Kyoto Boutique & Gallery in Portland

Images from Brittany Gipson’s (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘16)  mural at Kyoto Boutique in Portland.

bregipson:

Mural @ Kyoto Boutique & Gallery in Portland

Images from Brittany Gipson’s (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘16)  mural at Kyoto Boutique in Portland.

511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.
511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.
511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.
511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.
511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.
511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.
511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.
511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.
511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.

511pnca:

Last week, the glass skylights in the central atrium were uncovered at an event we called a Skybreaking. Arlene Schnitzer, after whom the building will be named, was on hand along with Representative Earl Blumenauer, Mayor Charlie Hales, Grace Neal of the office of US Senator Ron Wyden, Commissioner Nick Fish, Patrick Quinton, Executive Director of the PDC, and George Northcroft of the General Services Administration.

Amanda Wilcox (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘14) has been taking hauntingly lonely photos of her commute in southern Oregon as part of her practice.

Amanda Wilcox (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘14) has been taking hauntingly lonely photos of her commute in southern Oregon as part of her practice.

(Source: amandamartinwilcox)

daniellefoushee:

My former students were selected to be published in the prestigious Graphis New Talent 2014!

Danielle Foushee got a chance to show off her student’s talented work.

daniellefoushee:

My former students were selected to be published in the prestigious Graphis New Talent 2014!

Danielle Foushee got a chance to show off her student’s talented work.

Brittany Gipson (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘16) was interviewed by Eternal Sandbox. In it she talks about her inspirations, favorite artist tools, and her favorite pal Bosco the pup. Read up on her latest adventures on their blog.

Brittany Gipson (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘16) was interviewed by Eternal Sandbox. In it she talks about her inspirations, favorite artist tools, and her favorite pal Bosco the pup. Read up on her latest adventures on their blog.

Alanna Risse (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘15) has been turning wood on the lathe and got the chance to attend a demo by Bill Moore.

alannarisse:

Last week I had the honor of getting a wood turning demo by wood turner extraordinaire Bill Moore. Bill taught at PNCA for 39 years and is semi retired. I got a chance to show him my rayguns and talk about my technique and other materials to consider turning in. Thanks Bill!

Ryan Pierce at Elizabeth Leach Gallery October 2014

PNCA Low-Residency Visiting Artist and Mentor Ryan Pierce has a solo show at Elizabeth Leach Gallery in NW Portland through the month of October 2014.

About the show:

In Sad Gods, Portland-based artist, Ryan Pierce, investigates the link between our yearning to understand the nonhuman world and our desire to conquer it. The artist draws on inspiration from the journals of Spanish conquistadors and Enlightenment-era botanists, as well as indigenous American narratives foretelling European invasion. Pierce considers whether we are living in an era of new exploration, as we reshape our landscape through climate change, industrial agriculture and bio-engineering. 

Pierce received his MFA from California College of the Arts in 2007 and a BFA from Oregon College of Art & Craft in 2003. His work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally, including the CUE Foundation (New York, NY), Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art (Peekskill, NY), Roberts and Tilton Gallery (Los Angeles, CA), Lisa Dent Gallery (San Francisco, CA), and Babel Gallery (Trondheim, Norway). He has received recognition from Art in America, Art Papers, Art Week, and the Oregonian, and grants from The Joan Mitchell Foundation, San Francisco Foundation, and the Regional Arts and Culture Council. He is the recipient of a 2012 Individual Artist Fellowship from the Oregon Arts Commission. Pierce is the co-founder of Signal Fire, an organization that provides wilderness residencies and retreats to artists of all disciplines.

Ryan Pierce 
Sad Gods
New Paintings
 
OCTOBER 2 - NOVEMBER 1, 2014 
Elizabeth Leach Gallery

PNCA’s Low-Residency MFA in Visual Studies visiting a town near you

Want to know more about the Low-Residency MFA in Visual Studies?

PNCA’s Ford Graduate School will be hosting an Open House on November 14 & 15.  Come meet current students and faculty and get a close up look at all of our graduate programs.  Find details here

 

Can’t get to Portland but want to know more?  Meet Tracey Cockrell, Chair of Low-Residency MFA in Visual Studies, in a city near you:  

To make an appointment contact Tracey by email at tcockrell@pnca.edu

San Francisco, California

Sun, Oct 12: GRADUATE Portfolio Day,

California College of the Arts

The main San Francisco campus address is 1111 Eighth Street, located between Hooper and Irwin streets. More info here.

12:00pm - 4:00pm

New York City           

Sat, Oct 25: happy hour with current MFA students, look for details coming soon to this tumblr site

Sun, Oct 26: GRADUATE Portfolio Day,

Parsons The New School for Design

12:00pm - 4:00pm event details

Richmond, Virginia & Washington DC

October 30 & 31

by appointment

Portland, OR

November 14 & 15

PNCA Hallie Ford School of Graduate Studies

Graduate Open House

or by appointment

PNCA Graduate Chair Peter Schoonmaker and Graduate Admissions Counselor Carolyn Hopkins will be available to meet here:

Olympia, WA

October 22nd

Wed Oct 22nd, 11am - 3pm

Evergreen College

Evergreen GraduateFair

PNCA Graduate Chairs Peter Simensky and Matthew Letzelter will be available to meet here:

Chicago                       

Sun, Nov 9: GRADUATE Portfolio Day,

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

10:00am - 2:00pm event details

trishbrownleepnca:

A a new piece that I just completed, a full shot and close-ups so you can see the details. For now its abstract, though I am debating adding a photographic element to it later on if I decide to make it part of the thesis work. For now its going into a small group exhibit here in town with the below artist statement. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wv43nzy3hodxcwq/AADMlDAVjHBz_do_-7Afzgzja?dl=0
Artist Statement:
This work is part of a larger body of mixed media printmaking and photography that explores the conflict of military life for service members and their families. This exploration of internal struggle includes my own family, now as a military spouse and my past as a military veteran. Through this work I explore the inner conflict of military service: armor vs. vulnerability, isolation vs. connection, camouflage vs. exposure, and struggles pertaining to relationships, health, gender, and personal identity. This work serves as a form of self-therapy and is a way of coping with my own experiences with the military. I recognize that I have been damaged, but that I can bear witness to my own struggles and those of my family and friends. With this work I seek to disrupt misconceptions about the military individual and give agency and a voice to those use often remain silent. 
 
This individual work “The Photographs We Didn’t Make” is about location and unmade memories. It speaks to the struggle of being absent from one’s own life. My husband and I have spent much of our marriage on opposite sides of the world due to military service. This past year, we had our first child and my husband’s past deployment was our most difficult. We missed the opportunity to take so many family photographs and make so many memories together. It is hard. It is a struggle. Yet we are taught to remain to silent, to suck it up, to sacrifice without complaint. This work explores my personal conflict about this idea of sacrifice and all those untaken photographs. This work is my voice. It asks the question we are not supposed to voice: Is this worth it? 
This work is a 22’x30” monoprint collagraph made from ink, sand, glue, string, charcoal, and unexposed film on mulberry paper. 

New works by Trish Brownlee (PNCA LRVS ‘15)
trishbrownleepnca:

A a new piece that I just completed, a full shot and close-ups so you can see the details. For now its abstract, though I am debating adding a photographic element to it later on if I decide to make it part of the thesis work. For now its going into a small group exhibit here in town with the below artist statement. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wv43nzy3hodxcwq/AADMlDAVjHBz_do_-7Afzgzja?dl=0
Artist Statement:
This work is part of a larger body of mixed media printmaking and photography that explores the conflict of military life for service members and their families. This exploration of internal struggle includes my own family, now as a military spouse and my past as a military veteran. Through this work I explore the inner conflict of military service: armor vs. vulnerability, isolation vs. connection, camouflage vs. exposure, and struggles pertaining to relationships, health, gender, and personal identity. This work serves as a form of self-therapy and is a way of coping with my own experiences with the military. I recognize that I have been damaged, but that I can bear witness to my own struggles and those of my family and friends. With this work I seek to disrupt misconceptions about the military individual and give agency and a voice to those use often remain silent. 
 
This individual work “The Photographs We Didn’t Make” is about location and unmade memories. It speaks to the struggle of being absent from one’s own life. My husband and I have spent much of our marriage on opposite sides of the world due to military service. This past year, we had our first child and my husband’s past deployment was our most difficult. We missed the opportunity to take so many family photographs and make so many memories together. It is hard. It is a struggle. Yet we are taught to remain to silent, to suck it up, to sacrifice without complaint. This work explores my personal conflict about this idea of sacrifice and all those untaken photographs. This work is my voice. It asks the question we are not supposed to voice: Is this worth it? 
This work is a 22’x30” monoprint collagraph made from ink, sand, glue, string, charcoal, and unexposed film on mulberry paper. 

New works by Trish Brownlee (PNCA LRVS ‘15)
trishbrownleepnca:

A a new piece that I just completed, a full shot and close-ups so you can see the details. For now its abstract, though I am debating adding a photographic element to it later on if I decide to make it part of the thesis work. For now its going into a small group exhibit here in town with the below artist statement. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wv43nzy3hodxcwq/AADMlDAVjHBz_do_-7Afzgzja?dl=0
Artist Statement:
This work is part of a larger body of mixed media printmaking and photography that explores the conflict of military life for service members and their families. This exploration of internal struggle includes my own family, now as a military spouse and my past as a military veteran. Through this work I explore the inner conflict of military service: armor vs. vulnerability, isolation vs. connection, camouflage vs. exposure, and struggles pertaining to relationships, health, gender, and personal identity. This work serves as a form of self-therapy and is a way of coping with my own experiences with the military. I recognize that I have been damaged, but that I can bear witness to my own struggles and those of my family and friends. With this work I seek to disrupt misconceptions about the military individual and give agency and a voice to those use often remain silent. 
 
This individual work “The Photographs We Didn’t Make” is about location and unmade memories. It speaks to the struggle of being absent from one’s own life. My husband and I have spent much of our marriage on opposite sides of the world due to military service. This past year, we had our first child and my husband’s past deployment was our most difficult. We missed the opportunity to take so many family photographs and make so many memories together. It is hard. It is a struggle. Yet we are taught to remain to silent, to suck it up, to sacrifice without complaint. This work explores my personal conflict about this idea of sacrifice and all those untaken photographs. This work is my voice. It asks the question we are not supposed to voice: Is this worth it? 
This work is a 22’x30” monoprint collagraph made from ink, sand, glue, string, charcoal, and unexposed film on mulberry paper. 

New works by Trish Brownlee (PNCA LRVS ‘15)
trishbrownleepnca:

A a new piece that I just completed, a full shot and close-ups so you can see the details. For now its abstract, though I am debating adding a photographic element to it later on if I decide to make it part of the thesis work. For now its going into a small group exhibit here in town with the below artist statement. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wv43nzy3hodxcwq/AADMlDAVjHBz_do_-7Afzgzja?dl=0
Artist Statement:
This work is part of a larger body of mixed media printmaking and photography that explores the conflict of military life for service members and their families. This exploration of internal struggle includes my own family, now as a military spouse and my past as a military veteran. Through this work I explore the inner conflict of military service: armor vs. vulnerability, isolation vs. connection, camouflage vs. exposure, and struggles pertaining to relationships, health, gender, and personal identity. This work serves as a form of self-therapy and is a way of coping with my own experiences with the military. I recognize that I have been damaged, but that I can bear witness to my own struggles and those of my family and friends. With this work I seek to disrupt misconceptions about the military individual and give agency and a voice to those use often remain silent. 
 
This individual work “The Photographs We Didn’t Make” is about location and unmade memories. It speaks to the struggle of being absent from one’s own life. My husband and I have spent much of our marriage on opposite sides of the world due to military service. This past year, we had our first child and my husband’s past deployment was our most difficult. We missed the opportunity to take so many family photographs and make so many memories together. It is hard. It is a struggle. Yet we are taught to remain to silent, to suck it up, to sacrifice without complaint. This work explores my personal conflict about this idea of sacrifice and all those untaken photographs. This work is my voice. It asks the question we are not supposed to voice: Is this worth it? 
This work is a 22’x30” monoprint collagraph made from ink, sand, glue, string, charcoal, and unexposed film on mulberry paper. 

New works by Trish Brownlee (PNCA LRVS ‘15)

trishbrownleepnca:

A a new piece that I just completed, a full shot and close-ups so you can see the details. For now its abstract, though I am debating adding a photographic element to it later on if I decide to make it part of the thesis work.

For now its going into a small group exhibit here in town with the below artist statement.
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wv43nzy3hodxcwq/AADMlDAVjHBz_do_-7Afzgzja?dl=0

Artist Statement:
This work is part of a larger body of mixed media printmaking and photography that explores the conflict of military life for service members and their families. This exploration of internal struggle includes my own family, now as a military spouse and my past as a military veteran. Through this work I explore the inner conflict of military service: armor vs. vulnerability, isolation vs. connection, camouflage vs. exposure, and struggles pertaining to relationships, health, gender, and personal identity. This work serves as a form of self-therapy and is a way of coping with my own experiences with the military. I recognize that I have been damaged, but that I can bear witness to my own struggles and those of my family and friends. With this work I seek to disrupt misconceptions about the military individual and give agency and a voice to those use often remain silent.
 
This individual work “The Photographs We Didn’t Make” is about location and unmade memories. It speaks to the struggle of being absent from one’s own life. My husband and I have spent much of our marriage on opposite sides of the world due to military service. This past year, we had our first child and my husband’s past deployment was our most difficult. We missed the opportunity to take so many family photographs and make so many memories together. It is hard. It is a struggle. Yet we are taught to remain to silent, to suck it up, to sacrifice without complaint. This work explores my personal conflict about this idea of sacrifice and all those untaken photographs. This work is my voice. It asks the question we are not supposed to voice: Is this worth it?

This work is a 22’x30” monoprint collagraph made from ink, sand, glue, string, charcoal, and unexposed film on mulberry paper.

New works by Trish Brownlee (PNCA LRVS ‘15)

cdcpnca:

Design Week Portland is happening!
Stop by this Thursday at R/West and check out the latest work by Illustration and Communication Design seniors.
There will also be food, live DJ, and free zines!

cdcpnca:

Design Week Portland is happening!

Stop by this Thursday at R/West and check out the latest work by Illustration and Communication Design seniors.

There will also be food, live DJ, and free zines!

mfa-acd:

Come by the Bison tonight for First Friday!5:30pm

First Friday at the bison building tonight with applied craft + design.
mfa-acd:

Come by the Bison tonight for First Friday!5:30pm

First Friday at the bison building tonight with applied craft + design.

mfa-acd:

Come by the Bison tonight for First Friday!
5:30pm

First Friday at the bison building tonight with applied craft + design.

lizbyday:

"Breath" a brand new Animated gif by me. Why, because I like them. 
Cycles are coming back for me. This work is about moments remembered, time being stopped for this repeating memory. The present slowly changes what the memory originally was as we age and get further in time from that moment.
As I create these moments the people in them become more like representations of myself. Of moments I remember represented by other people. Who they are is unimportant. The value of the found imagery is the mood and story created by the people within the space. 

The latest animated gif by Liz Randal (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘15).

lizbyday:

"Breath" a brand new Animated gif by me. Why, because I like them. 

Cycles are coming back for me. This work is about moments remembered, time being stopped for this repeating memory. The present slowly changes what the memory originally was as we age and get further in time from that moment.

As I create these moments the people in them become more like representations of myself. Of moments I remember represented by other people. Who they are is unimportant. The value of the found imagery is the mood and story created by the people within the space. 

The latest animated gif by Liz Randal (PNCA LRVS MFA ‘15).